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WEDDING TWO-APRON COSTUME FROM THE VILLAGE OF BRASHLYANITSA, PLEVEN REGION


WEDDING TWO-APRON COSTUME FROM THE VILLAGE OF BRASHLYANITSA, PLEVEN REGION

Second half of the XIXth - the beginning of the XXth century. The costume is from the collection of Tanya Kirovska - Gramatikova, a true connoisseur and researcher of the next costumes from Northern Bulgaria, gathered in an invaluable collection of unique costumes from different regions!

👉 You can view the calendar here.

👉The costume dressed the beautiful girl Donna Gramatikova.

👉 Two apron costume consisting of:

🔸 Back piece (valnenik) - it is composed of two woolen strips of fabric, woven multicolored strips of ornaments, connected by a horizontal seam and frilly at the top with 6-7 rows of woolen thread so as to form fine pleats. Covers the lower body to above the knees. The predominant colour is deep red. The lower part is richly decorated with filigree edging, lace, coloured edging and sequins. The bottom is circled with a black woolen strip of cloth called a “tsopa”.

🔸 Shirt with a curved bosom (big “parki”) - made of home-woven white cotton fabric with a side bosom slit. The entire front, which is frill, is ornately embroidered with small geometric ornaments, triangles and rhombus executed in straight stitch. The sleeve is also very richly decorated. Three stripes run down its entire length - the middle one with a thick embroidery and the side ones with a looser one. The embroidery is dark, with black predominating.

WEDDING TWO-APRON COSTUME FROM THE VILLAGE OF BRASHLYANITSA, PLEVEN REGION

🔸 Apron (bohcha) - consists of one fabric and is narrow and long almost to the ankles. It is woven in the same ornaments as the back apron, but smaller in size and arranged in multicolored rows. The apron is richly decorated with filigree edgings and lace in triangular shapes and ciecled on three sides with black wool fabric, sewn with sequins and colored wool threads.

🔸 “Klashnik” (kasak) - an upper garment of white woollen cloth, long to above the knees, open in front and without sleeves. Its cut is more intricate, with pieces inserted on both sides and decorated with embroidered elements of red “sukno” on both sides of the upper back, the top of the pieces and the pockets. It is worn on the day of the wedding and is worn until St George's Day or Midsummer.

🔸 “Kaitsa” - a bridal headscarf that is put on on the day of the wedding and worn until the birth of the first child, when it is replaced by a white headscarf. At its base, this headscarf has a wooden semicircle or mulberry sticks screwed together and covered by a white cotton cloth. A white “barish” is placed on top of them, with several rows of coins and beads sewn on the front, and pendants (peleshki) also made of coins and beads hang on either side. Multicoloured wool tassels are arranged along the edge. The “kaitsa” is worn continuously from the day of the wedding until St. George's Day or Midsummer Day, when the brother-in-law takes it off together with the “kasak”. Then while the woman is still young, puts it only on feast days for the round dance.

🔸 Socks - knitted from multicoloured woolen yarns with geometric ornaments in stripes.


WEDDING TWO-APRON COSTUME FROM THE VILLAGE OF BRASHLYANITSA, PLEVEN REGION

👉 See how the beautiful Donna presents herself here in her business card:

"My name is Donna. My mother and father are Bulgarians, but I grew up in the Netherlands, where my parents worked. I study in an English school. I like to study different languages. I like to go out with friends in my free time and listen to music.

Although we have lived abroad for many years, we have always observed in our family the traditions of the Bulgarian holidays - Christmas, Easter, Lazarus Day. I love Christmas Eve, when the whole family gathers at home, eats traditional Bulgarian dishes and dresses in costumes. While we were living in the Netherlands, I attended a Bulgarian Sunday school, where we had folk dance classes.

We currently live in Sofia, but since we study online we spend more time in Koynare, where my mother is from. I like the place very much because it is quiet there, I have many friends and I feel free. In Koynare, many customs are traditionally observed - such as Christmas and Lazarus, and last year my mother organized a revival of the Kumichene custom, in which I also participated.

I am familiar with the feeling of wearing a Bulgarian costume. Mom collects costumes and I grew up with them. I often wear costumes, but it always makes me feel special. And there are many reasons to wear costumes, especially when your mother is a collector.

My homeland Bulgaria is a wonderful country! "


👉 Photographer: Petar Petrov


❤ Тhe Live Roots of Bulgaria Foundation would like to thank Olcom Ltd. MoiataKozmetika.com as well as the digital agency Bogara Ltd. for the support in publishing this calendar!



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